performing art

Chandelier Cover by Sara Bareilles

I’ve been in love with Sara Bareilles’ music since I first heard it in high school. She’s one of the few artists where I actually know the lyrics only because I love her voice and her whole style as an artist.

Currently, she’s on tour for her latest album The Blessed Unrest. On her Little Black Dress Tour, she’s been doing a cover of Sia’s newest single, Chandelier. I just found this through Facebook and have been listening to it on repeat for at least an hour or two. No shame at all.

She sings this song with so much emotion that you can almost empathize with her in the lyrics. There’s so much authenticity in the way she sings this song that it gives me the chills. On top of that, it’s acoustic! So more chills!

Here’s the original Chandelier by Sia:

I’ll be listening to the Sara Bareilles’ acoustic version on repeat for awhile. I hope I can buy this online somehow! Thank you Huffington Post for writing an article about how awesome Sara Bareilles is especially live at concerts! She brings a personable character to her shows that makes me feel like I’m actually friends with her!

Dancing In The Dark

There are some dances out there online that I can watch on repeat for hours and hours especially when the dancers can evoke such deep and raw emotions for the viewers to experience. I recently watched one that gave me the chills and brought me into a pensive mood. Watch Dancing In The Dark performed by Matt Luck and Emma Portner:

Did this dance just change your mood or what? Did it make you pause and think for a second? It sure made me reflect on the lyrics and the emotions that built up within me. Even though I’ve seen this so many times, I am constantly in awe by the artwork of this dance. You can feel the story they are telling us because Matt and Emma are so honest in every movement within this dance. They dance so effortlessly and flawlessly that their story is told naturally.

Thanks Chelsea for sharing this beautiful dance with me! Oh man, I’m definitely going to watch again now.

LA Part One: USC Concerto Night

I’m taking a piano class at a community college and my piano instructor invited the class to her performance with the USC Thornton Symphony at the Bovard Auditorium. I was very much impressed by every single piece of music that was performed. First, Joseph Morris, a clarinetist performed Neilsen’s Clarinet Concerto flawlessly. Oh man. I’ve never seen a clarinetist perform like Morris. His musicality was so controlled yet so freely played beautifully. As he performed, you were able to tell he was very much in sync with the music. If you ever have the opportunity to see Morris perform this song or to listen to this song live at a concert, I highly recommend you to take advantage of it. His performance was one where you had to be there experience the difficulty of the piece he played.

Frederich-Olivier Rosselet, a cellist, performed Lutoslawski’s Cello Concerto. Now this piece brought out all kinds of emotions from me and my friends. There was darkness, confusion, terror, and loneliness from this piece. If you closed your eyes and listened to this song, it almost felt like you were hiding from someone who was chasing you or you were trying to run away and somehow ended up getting lost in a pitch black room or a forest at night. You pace back and forth not knowing what to do because all your thoughts are scattered as you’re by yourself in the middle of nowhere.

Playing an open string so gently seemed almost harmless but in this piece, it still carried a bold sense of emotion. Whether you open or close your eyes during a live performance of this piece, I am sure that you will be carried away by your emotions. Even the musician, Rosselet, was so lost in the music because the piece had a heavy character to it that required great technical skills to execute almost effortlessly and beautifully.
Frederich-Olivier Rosselet

The final performance was my piano instructor, Fang-Fang Shi Inouye. From the beginning, you were able to hear easily that the music was composed by Beethoven. Inouye gracefully played Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1 with great flow of emotion. I was in awe of how she moved across the keyboard effortlessly and so quickly. Though I saw with my own eyes that she was hitting every note, I still could not believe the intensity of her technical skills. Her performance was a great way to end the show as it had an enlightening experience to it.

This concert certainly inspired me to continue playing music as it is an art that challenges the mind and imagination in so many levels. I hope to attend another Conceto Night performed by USC or different symphony sometime soon. It’s really amazing how music can really paint emotions to your ears.
Fang-Fang Shi Inouye